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ТЕЙЛОР Джон У. 1784-1854 США, конгрессмен TAYLOR John W. 1784-1854 USA, congressman

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_W._Taylor_(politician)
John W. Taylor (March 26, 1784 – September 18, 1854) was an early 19th-century U.S. politician from New York. He was the first Speaker of the House of Representatives from the state.

Life[edit]

He was born in 1784 in that part of the Town of Ballston, then in Albany County, New York, which was, upon the creation of Saratoga County in 1791, split off to form the Town of Charlton. He received his first education at home.
Taylor graduated from Union College in 1803 as valedictorian of his class. Then he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1807, and practiced in Ballston Spa, New York. In 1806, he married Jane Hodge (died 1838), of Albany, New York, and they had eight children. He was a member from Saratoga County of the New York State Assembly in 1812 and 1812–13.
Taylor served in the United States House of Representatives for 20 years, from 1813 to 1833, and served twice as Speaker of the House. He also was a representative of New York in the Missouri Compromise, where he took a stance against the extension of slavery along with people such as John Quincy Adams.
After leaving Congress, Taylor resumed his law practice in Ballston Spa, and was a member of the New York State Senate (4th D.) in 1841 and 1842. He resigned his seat on August 19, 1842, after suffering a paralytic stroke. In 1843, he moved to ClevelandOhio, to live with his eldest daughter and her husband William D. Beattie, and died there 11 years later.[1] He was buried in the Ballston Spa Village Cemetery.[2]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Genealogy of Judge John Taylor and His Descendants , pages 25ff
  2. Jump up^ John W. Taylor at Find a Grave

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas R. Gold
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th congressional district

1813–1823
Succeeded by
Charles A. Foote
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1820–1821
Succeeded by
Philip Pendleton Barbour
Preceded by
Thomas H. Hubbard
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th congressional district

1823–1833
Succeeded by
Samuel Beardsley,
Joel Turrill
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1825–1827
Succeeded by
Andrew Stevenson
New York State Senate
Preceded by
Samuel Young
New York State Senate
Fourth District (Class 2)

1841–1842
Succeeded by
Sidney Lawrence
[show]
Speakers of the United States House of Representatives

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  • This page was last modified on 24 January 2017, at 21:34.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_W._Taylor_(politician)
John W. Taylor (March 26, 1784 – September 18, 1854) was an early 19th-century U.S. politician from New York. He was the first Speaker of the House of Representatives from the state.

Life[edit]

He was born in 1784 in that part of the Town of Ballston, then in Albany County, New York, which was, upon the creation of Saratoga County in 1791, split off to form the Town of Charlton. He received his first education at home.
Taylor graduated from Union College in 1803 as valedictorian of his class. Then he studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1807, and practiced in Ballston Spa, New York. In 1806, he married Jane Hodge (died 1838), of Albany, New York, and they had eight children. He was a member from Saratoga County of the New York State Assembly in 1812 and 1812–13.
Taylor served in the United States House of Representatives for 20 years, from 1813 to 1833, and served twice as Speaker of the House. He also was a representative of New York in the Missouri Compromise, where he took a stance against the extension of slavery along with people such as John Quincy Adams.
After leaving Congress, Taylor resumed his law practice in Ballston Spa, and was a member of the New York State Senate (4th D.) in 1841 and 1842. He resigned his seat on August 19, 1842, after suffering a paralytic stroke. In 1843, he moved to ClevelandOhio, to live with his eldest daughter and her husband William D. Beattie, and died there 11 years later.[1] He was buried in the Ballston Spa Village Cemetery.[2]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Genealogy of Judge John Taylor and His Descendants , pages 25ff
  2. Jump up^ John W. Taylor at Find a Grave

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas R. Gold
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th congressional district

1813–1823
Succeeded by
Charles A. Foote
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1820–1821
Succeeded by
Philip Pendleton Barbour
Preceded by
Thomas H. Hubbard
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th congressional district

1823–1833
Succeeded by
Samuel Beardsley,
Joel Turrill
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
1825–1827
Succeeded by
Andrew Stevenson
New York State Senate
Preceded by
Samuel Young
New York State Senate
Fourth District (Class 2)

1841–1842
Succeeded by
Sidney Lawrence
[show]
Speakers of the United States House of Representatives

Categories

Navigation menu

Search

Interaction

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Print/export

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Edit links
  • This page was last modified on 24 January 2017, at 21:34.
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http://www.anb.org/articles/03/03-00660.html
Taylor, John W. (26 Mar. 1784-18 Sept. 1854), congressman, was born in Charlton, Saratoga County, New York, the son of John Taylor, a farmer who later became a judge, and Chloe Cox Taylor. After receiving his early education at home, Taylor entered Union College in Schenectady, New York, in 1799. Although he had originally planned a career in the ministry, he became interested in the legal profession and graduated in 1803. Upon completing his formal education, Taylor briefly taught school at the Ballston Centre Academy and studied law with Samuel Cook. In 1807, upon gaining admittance to the bar, he entered into a law partnership with Cook in Ballston Spa and also ran a lumber mill in Hadley. On 10 July 1806 he married Jane Hodge in Albany, New York. They had eight children.
Taylor entered his life's calling, public office, on the local level as a justice of the peace in Ballston Spa in March 1808. A month later he added the duties of state loan commissioner. These offices were rewards for supporting the faction of the Republican Party led by De Witt Clinton. In the spring of 1811, Taylor won a seat in the state legislature, and he took office in January of the following year. Although the Republicans controlled the lower house, their Federalist opponents composed most of the talent within the body, and Taylor quickly rose to a position of leadership. He headed committees on expiring laws and one concerned with the possible abolition of slavery. He took a leading role in unsuccessfully opposing the creation of a local substitute for the Bank of the United States, fearing that too many banks issuing too much currency would lead to general depreciation. Taylor also headed a bipartisan committee that investigated scandals involving a lottery to benefit his alma mater, Union College.
In December 1812 Taylor won election to the U.S. House of Representatives. He remained in that body for the next twenty years and eventually chaired the Committee on Elections (twice) and the Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business. Initially appointed a member of the Committee of Military Affairs by House Speaker Henry Clay, Taylor defended President James Madison against Federalist attacks regarding the conduct of the War of 1812 and rendered valuable assistance on a special committee charged with overhauling the nation's militia. As a member of the Committee of Ways and Means, he supported the reestablishment of a national bank and the implementation of a protective trade tariff.
Taylor entered the national limelight in February 1819, when he seconded an amendment by fellow New York representative James Tallmadge to the Missouri enabling act that would have prohibited slavery in the new state. While unwilling to disturb slavery in the states where it already existed, Taylor opposed its extension beyond the Mississippi River, fearing that free market labor could not successfully compete in a slaveholding environment. "Our vote this day will determine whether the high destinies of this region, and, of those generations, shall be fulfilled or whether we shall defeat them by permitting slavery, with all its baleful consequences, to inherit the land," he warned (Spann, p. 190). His antislavery speeches were among the first in Congress. Although initial reaction to his speeches on the subject was muted, the issue made Taylor the de facto leader of the so-called "restrictionists," and with Clay's backing he won election as Speaker of the House in 1820.
As Speaker, Taylor won approval throughout the political spectrum for his parliamentary skill, yet his attempts to remain above the partisan fray failed to overcome suspicions from a faction of the New York Republican party, led by Martin Van Buren and known as the "Bucktails," that Taylor remained a stalwart supporter of their arch nemesis Clinton. A longtime advocate of economy in government, Taylor also offended Secretary of War John C. Calhoun and Secretary of the Navy Smith Thompson with his support of military budget cuts in response to the declining tax revenues in the aftermath of the panic of 1819. The combined opposition from New York and the Madison administration resulted in replacement of Taylor as Speaker after one term.
Though despondent about losing the Speakership, Taylor bided his time in Congress, taking few leadership roles. He became close to John Quincy Adams, who had supported his bid for reelection as Speaker, and backed Adams's successful bid for the presidency in 1824. With Adams's endorsement, Taylor regained the Speakership in 1825, and he generally supported administration policies. The Adams administration's difficulties, however, gave hope to Taylor's rivals. Van Buren, whose faction was emerging as the Democratic Party, again worked to dump Taylor. In 1826 Taylor was again ousted from the Speakership. He remained in Congress until 1832, when he was defeated for reelection largely because of an unsubstantiated rumor of marital infidelity spread by his enemies, a coalition of Jacksonians, Van Burenites, Masons, and opponents of the Second National Bank.
Taylor returned to Saratoga County and practiced law for a number of years. In 1840 he resumed elective politics and was elected to the New York State Senate. He resigned in 1842 after becoming incapacitated by a stroke. In 1843 he relocated to Cleveland, Ohio, where he resided with one of his daughters until he died.
Although his place in history is secure by virtue of his two stints as Speaker of the House of Representatives, Taylor was at best a minor figure in the political scene of his day. His speeches during the initial controversy over the admission of Missouri to the Union provide valuable insights into the issues surrounding that debate. Reluctant to abandon the idea of statesmanship over partisan politics, he was largely unable to navigate the political currents that swirled through the American landscape of his day.
  
 

BibliographyTaylor's papers are divided among the New-York Historical Society and the New York Public Library in New York City and the New York State Library in Albany. Edward Kenneth Spann, "John W. Taylor, the Reluctant Partisan, 1784-1854" (Ph.D. diss., New York Univ., 1957), is informative on his life and career. Obituaries are in the New York Tribune, 22 Sept. 1854, and the Ballston Journal, 27 Sept. 1854.

Edward L. Lach, Jr. 
 
http://www.anb.org/articles/03/03-00660.html​
Taylor, John W. (26 Mar. 1784-18 Sept. 1854), congressman, was born in Charlton, Saratoga County, New York, the son of John Taylor, a farmer who later became a judge, and Chloe Cox Taylor. After receiving his early education at home, Taylor entered Union College in Schenectady, New York, in 1799. Although he had originally planned a career in the ministry, he became interested in the legal profession and graduated in 1803. Upon completing his formal education, Taylor briefly taught school at the Ballston Centre Academy and studied law with Samuel Cook. In 1807, upon gaining admittance to the bar, he entered into a law partnership with Cook in Ballston Spa and also ran a lumber mill in Hadley. On 10 July 1806 he married Jane Hodge in Albany, New York. They had eight children.
Taylor entered his life's calling, public office, on the local level as a justice of the peace in Ballston Spa in March 1808. A month later he added the duties of state loan commissioner. These offices were rewards for supporting the faction of the Republican Party led by De Witt Clinton. In the spring of 1811, Taylor won a seat in the state legislature, and he took office in January of the following year. Although the Republicans controlled the lower house, their Federalist opponents composed most of the talent within the body, and Taylor quickly rose to a position of leadership. He headed committees on expiring laws and one concerned with the possible abolition of slavery. He took a leading role in unsuccessfully opposing the creation of a local substitute for the Bank of the United States, fearing that too many banks issuing too much currency would lead to general depreciation. Taylor also headed a bipartisan committee that investigated scandals involving a lottery to benefit his alma mater, Union College.
In December 1812 Taylor won election to the U.S. House of Representatives. He remained in that body for the next twenty years and eventually chaired the Committee on Elections (twice) and the Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business. Initially appointed a member of the Committee of Military Affairs by House Speaker Henry Clay, Taylor defended President James Madison against Federalist attacks regarding the conduct of the War of 1812 and rendered valuable assistance on a special committee charged with overhauling the nation's militia. As a member of the Committee of Ways and Means, he supported the reestablishment of a national bank and the implementation of a protective trade tariff.
Taylor entered the national limelight in February 1819, when he seconded an amendment by fellow New York representative James Tallmadge to the Missouri enabling act that would have prohibited slavery in the new state. While unwilling to disturb slavery in the states where it already existed, Taylor opposed its extension beyond the Mississippi River, fearing that free market labor could not successfully compete in a slaveholding environment. "Our vote this day will determine whether the high destinies of this region, and, of those generations, shall be fulfilled or whether we shall defeat them by permitting slavery, with all its baleful consequences, to inherit the land," he warned (Spann, p. 190). His antislavery speeches were among the first in Congress. Although initial reaction to his speeches on the subject was muted, the issue made Taylor the de facto leader of the so-called "restrictionists," and with Clay's backing he won election as Speaker of the House in 1820.
As Speaker, Taylor won approval throughout the political spectrum for his parliamentary skill, yet his attempts to remain above the partisan fray failed to overcome suspicions from a faction of the New York Republican party, led by Martin Van Buren and known as the "Bucktails," that Taylor remained a stalwart supporter of their arch nemesis Clinton. A longtime advocate of economy in government, Taylor also offended Secretary of War John C. Calhoun and Secretary of the Navy Smith Thompson with his support of military budget cuts in response to the declining tax revenues in the aftermath of the panic of 1819. The combined opposition from New York and the Madison administration resulted in replacement of Taylor as Speaker after one term.
Though despondent about losing the Speakership, Taylor bided his time in Congress, taking few leadership roles. He became close to John Quincy Adams, who had supported his bid for reelection as Speaker, and backed Adams's successful bid for the presidency in 1824. With Adams's endorsement, Taylor regained the Speakership in 1825, and he generally supported administration policies. The Adams administration's difficulties, however, gave hope to Taylor's rivals. Van Buren, whose faction was emerging as the Democratic Party, again worked to dump Taylor. In 1826 Taylor was again ousted from the Speakership. He remained in Congress until 1832, when he was defeated for reelection largely because of an unsubstantiated rumor of marital infidelity spread by his enemies, a coalition of Jacksonians, Van Burenites, Masons, and opponents of the Second National Bank.
Taylor returned to Saratoga County and practiced law for a number of years. In 1840 he resumed elective politics and was elected to the New York State Senate. He resigned in 1842 after becoming incapacitated by a stroke. In 1843 he relocated to Cleveland, Ohio, where he resided with one of his daughters until he died.
Although his place in history is secure by virtue of his two stints as Speaker of the House of Representatives, Taylor was at best a minor figure in the political scene of his day. His speeches during the initial controversy over the admission of Missouri to the Union provide valuable insights into the issues surrounding that debate. Reluctant to abandon the idea of statesmanship over partisan politics, he was largely unable to navigate the political currents that swirled through the American landscape of his day.
  
 

BibliographyTaylor's papers are divided among the New-York Historical Society and the New York Public Library in New York City and the New York State Library in Albany. Edward Kenneth Spann, "John W. Taylor, the Reluctant Partisan, 1784-1854" (Ph.D. diss., New York Univ., 1957), is informative on his life and career. Obituaries are in the New York Tribune, 22 Sept. 1854, and the Ballston Journal, 27 Sept. 1854.

Edward L. Lach, Jr. 
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